What Finding Purpose in Your Career Really Means, According to Mark Zuckerberg



Purpose.

It’s what drives us to find a job we love. It’s what the world tells us is even more important than money, fame, or success.

But what does it actually mean?

Here’s a twist: Purpose isn’t exactly about

you.

Or, so says Mark Zuckerberg in his

2017 commencement speech at Harvard University,

his (almost) alma mater. His pride and glory, Facebook, started as a way to connect students, but what he didn’t realize—but is so grateful he discovered—is that Facebook could be so much more powerful. That it could become a way to connect

the world.

And this is how he uncovered the meaning of purpose:

Purpose is that sense that we are part of something bigger than ourselves, that we are needed, that we have something better ahead to work for. Purpose is what creates true happiness…But it’s not enough to have purpose yourself. You have to create a sense of purpose for others.


Finding meaning in your career

takes more than just helping yourself thrive. It’s about working toward something that will ultimately make everyone better and happier.

And more importantly, you don’t have to save the world to do this. Maybe it’s about applying to jobs that work with clients to improve processes, or working for a company with a strong mission of doing good, or even initiating a new project in your current role.

As Zuckerberg says, we reward people for personal success, but don’t get rewarded enough for taking the leaps that’ll help everyone succeed.

And those leaps may just be the key to career happiness.

If you’re now in the mood to watch even more inspirational speeches, check out:

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About Richard Moy

Richard Moy
Richard Moy is a Content Marketing Writer at Stack Overflow. He has spent the majority of his career in talent management, including a stint as a full-cycle recruiter and hiring manager. In addition to the career advice he contributes to The Muse, he also writes test prep and higher education marketing content for The Economist. Say hi on Twitter @rich_moy.

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